Words that may give comfort in your sadness

Here are some poems and thoughts that others have found of some comfort ….

 

Don’t tell me that you understand.

Don’t tell me that you know.
Don’t tell me that I will survive,
How I will surely grow.

Don’t come at me with answers
That can only come from me.
Don’t tell me how my grief will pass,
That I will soon be free.

Accept me in my ups and downs.
I need someone to share.
Just hold my hand and let me cry
And say, “My friend, I care”

 

All Is Well

Death is nothing at all,
I have only slipped into the next room
I am I and you are you
Whatever we were to each other, that we are still.
Call me by my old familiar name,
Speak to me in the easy way which you always used
Put no difference in your tone,
Wear no forced air of solemnity or sorrow
Laugh as we always laughed at the little jokes we enjoyed together.
Play, smile, think of me, pray for me.
Let my name be ever the household word that it always was,
Let it be spoken without effect, without the trace of shadow on it.
Life means all that it ever meant.
It it the same as it ever was, there is unbroken continuity.
Why should I be out of mind because I am out of sight?
I am waiting for you, for an interval, somewhere very near,
Just around the corner.
All is well.

Henry Scott Holland (1847-1918)

 

When we honestly ask ourselves which person in our lives means the most us, we often find that it is those who, instead of giving much advice, solutions, or cures, have chosen rather to share our pain and touch our wounds with a gentle and tender hand. The friend who can be silent with us in a moment of despair or confusion, who can stay with us in an hour of grief and bereavement, who can tolerate not knowing, not curing, not healing and face with us the reality of our powerlessness, that is a friend who cares.

 Henri Nouwen  

 

Why do I feel this way?

 Other sources of support

The Stages of Grieving